affected person – Wiktionary

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March 29, 2021 0 Comments

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Center French affected person, from Previous French pacient, from Latin patiens, current participle of patior (to endure, endure), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₁- (to hate, harm).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpeɪʃənt/
  • Hyphenation: pa‧tient

Adjective[edit]

affected person (comparative patienter or extra affected person, superlative patientest or most affected person)

  1. (of an individual) Keen to attend if mandatory; not shedding one’s mood whereas ready.

    Be affected person: your mates will arrive in a couple of hours.

  2. Fixed in pursuit or exertion; persevering; calmly diligent.

    affected person endeavour

    • December 15, 2016, Hettie Judah within the New York Occasions, Beloved Kids’s-E-book Characters, in Their Personal Immersive World
      “Her private life and her artwork had been very intertwined: You may’t actually separate them,” explains Sophia Jansson. “She mirrored her personal a actuality onto a fictional actuality.” And that is maybe the nub of the Moomin’s enduring attraction: a mixture of adventuresome spirit and philosophy, all of which Jansson derived from shut and affected person statement, of human relationships and of the pure world alike.
    • c. 1692, Sir Isaac Newton, letter to Dr. Richard Bentley
      No matter I’ve accomplished [] is because of [] affected person thought.
  3. (out of date) Bodily in a position to endure or bear.
    • 1661, John Fell, Physician Henry Hammond, 1810, Christopher Wordsworth (editor), Ecclesiastical Biography, Quantity 5, web page 380,
      To this outward construction was joined that power of structure, affected person of severest toil and hardship; insomuch that for essentially the most a part of his life, within the fiercest extremity of chilly, he took no different benefit of a fireplace, than on the best distance that he may, to look upon it.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

affected person (plural sufferers)

  1. An individual or animal who receives remedy from a health care provider or different medically educated individual.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, in The Mirror and the Lamp:

      The slightest effort made the affected person cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his facet, and when the paroxysm had handed it left him shaking.

    • 2013 June 1, “A greater waterworks”, in The Economist[1], quantity 407, quantity 8838, web page 5 (Expertise Quarterly):

      A man-made kidney lately nonetheless means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such units mimic [] actual kidneys [] . However they’re nothing like as environment friendly, and may trigger bleeding, clotting and an infection—to not point out inconvenience for sufferers, who usually have to be hooked as much as one thrice every week for hours at a time.

  2. (linguistics, grammar) The noun or noun phrase that’s semantically on the receiving finish of a verb’s motion.

    The topic of a passive verb is often a affected person.

    • 1982, Paul J. Hopper, Tense-aspect: Between Semantics & Pragmatics, →ISBN:

      The variety of a primary or second individual participant is usually marked for each agent and affected person in all elements.

    • 2004, Paul Kroeger, Analyzing Syntax: A Lexical-Practical Method, →ISBN, web page 292:

      Since we now have argued that the absolutive argument in Dyirbal is the grammatical topic of its clause, we should conclude that within the antipassive development the agent replaces the affected person as grammatical topic.

  3. One who, or that which, is passively affected; a passive recipient.
    • c. 1658, Dr. Henry Extra, Authorities of the Tongue
      Malice is a ardour so impetuous and precipitate, that it usually includes the agent and the affected person.
    • 1988, Sarah Waterlow & Sarah Broadie, Nature, Change, and Company in Aristotle’s Physics, →ISBN, web page 159:

      For it appears clear that the topic of change is the changed, i.e. the affected person — on one proviso. the proviso is that there be an agent or changer.

    • 1994, Larry Cochran & Joan Laub, Changing into an Agent: Patterns and Dynamics for Shaping Your Life, →ISBN:

      How does an individual change from a affected person to an agent in shaping and dwelling a course of life?

    • 1999, Lloyd P. Gerson, Aristotle: Logic and metaphysics, →ISBN, web page 127:

      In accordance with the custom, when an agent acts on a affected person, the change is positioned within the affected person. If the affected person reacts on the agent, then the agent is a affected person within the new relation.

    • 2010, Mohua Banerjee & Anil Seth, Logic and Its Purposes: Fourth Indian Convention, ICLA 2011, →ISBN, web page 7:

      The place to begin is that every one occasions contain an agent and a affected person. Brokers and sufferers are modelled as (materials or non-material) objects, and may due to this fact be represented as factors in conceptual areas.

Antonyms[edit]

  • (linguistics, grammar): agent

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

See additionally[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Latin patiēns (struggling), the current energetic participle of patior (to endure).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

affected person c (singular particular patienten, plural indefinite patienter)

  1. affected person (individual or animal who receives remedy from a health care provider or different medically educated individual)

Inflection[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

See additionally[edit]

References[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Center French affected person, from Previous French affected person, borrowed from Latin patiēns, patientem

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

affected person (female singular patiente, masculine plural sufferers, female plural patientes)

  1. affected person
    Antonym: impatient

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Noun[edit]

affected person m (plural sufferers, female patiente)

  1. a affected person, an outpatient

Additional studying[edit]


Previous French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin patiens, patientem.

Noun[edit]

affected person m (indirect plural patienz or patientz, nominative singular patienz or patientz, nominative plural affected person)

  1. (medication) affected person

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

affected person c

  1. a affected person

Declension[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

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