blood – Wiktionary

blood - Wiktionary
January 5, 2021 0 Comments

English[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center English blood, from Previous English blōd, from Proto-West Germanic *blōd, from Proto-Germanic *blōþą, of unsure origin. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Bloud, West Frisian bloed, Dutch bloed, German Blut, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian blod.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

blood (countable and uncountable, plural bloods)

  1. A significant liquid flowing within the our bodies of many kinds of animals that often conveys vitamins and oxygen. In vertebrates, it’s coloured crimson by hemoglobin, is conveyed by arteries and veins, is pumped by the guts and is often generated in bone marrow.
    The cultists gathered round a chalice of blood.
    • 1650, Thomas Browne, “Of the Cameleon”, in Pseudodoxia Epidemica: [], 2nd version, London: [] A. Miller, for Edw[ard] Dod and Nath[aniel] Ekins, [], OCLC 152706203, third ebook, web page 133:

      It can’t be denied it [the chameleon] is (if not the moſt of any) a really abſtemious animall, and ſuch as by reaſon of its frigidity, paucity of bloud, and latitancy within the winter (about which era the obſervations are sometimes made) will lengthy ſubſist with no viſible ſuſtentation.
    • 1927, F. E. Penny, chapter 4, in Pulling the Strings:

      The case was that of a homicide. It had a component of thriller about it, nevertheless, which was puzzling the authorities. A turban and loincloth soaked in blood had been discovered; additionally a employees.

    • 2013 June 1, “A greater waterworks”, in The Economist[1], quantity 407, quantity 8838, web page 5 (Expertise Quarterly):

      A synthetic kidney lately nonetheless means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such units mimic the way in which actual kidneys cleanse blood and eject impurities and surplus water as urine.

  2. A household relationship resulting from start, akin to that between siblings; contrasted with relationships resulting from marriage or adoption (see blood relative, blood relation, by blood).
    • 1690, Edmund Waller, The Maid’s Tragedy Altered
      a buddy of our personal blood
  3. (historic) One of many 4 humours within the human physique.
  4. (drugs, countable) A blood take a look at or blood pattern.
    • 2016, Steve Jamieson, Bilbo the Lifeguard Canine:

      Once I obtained Bilbo to their surgical procedure the vet took Bilbo in for exams. [] His bloods confirmed nothing unsuitable in any respect.

  5. The sap or juice which flows in or from vegetation.
    • 1841, Benjamin Parsons, Anti-Bacchus, web page 95:
      It’s no tautology to name the blood of the grape crimson or purple, as a result of the juice of that fruit was generally white and generally black or darkish. The arterial blood of our our bodies is crimson, however the venous is known as “black blood.”
    • 1901, Levi Leslie Lamborn, American Carnation Tradition, fourth version, web page 57:
      Disbudding is merely a species of pruning, and ought to be completed as quickly because the lateral buds start to develop on the cane. It diverts the stream of the plant’s blood from many buds into one or a number of, thus growing the scale of the flower, […]
    • 1916, John Gordon Dorrance, The Story of the Forest, web page 44:
      Take a look at a leaf. On it are many little raised strains which attain out to all elements of the leaf and again to the stem and twig. These are “veins,” stuffed with the tree’s blood. It’s white and appears very very similar to water; […]
  6. (poetic) The juice of something, particularly if crimson.
  7. (out of date) Mood of thoughts; disposition; temper
    • c. 1596–1599, William Shakespeare, “The Second A part of Henry the Fourth, []”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act 4, scene iii]:

      When thou understand his blood inclined to mirth

    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The Home by the Churchyard:

      There was some little undefinable coolness between previous Normal Chattesworth and Devereux. He admired the younger fellow, and he preferred good blood in his corps, however in some way he was glad when he thought he was more likely to go. When previous Bligh, of the Journal, recommended the good-looking younger canine’s attractiveness, the overall would develop grave []

  8. (out of date) A vigorous, showy man; a rake; a dandy.
    • 1598–1599 (first efficiency), William Shakespeare, “A lot Adoe about Nothing”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iii]:

      Seest thou not [] how giddily ‘a turns about all the new bloods between fourteen and 5 and thirty?

    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vainness Truthful, Chapter 3:
      [] it was the morning costume of a dandy or blood of these days []
  9. A blood horse, one in all good pedigree.
  10. (figuratively) Bloodshed.
    They got here searching for blood.
    • 1873, The Month-to-month Packet of Night Readings for Members of the English Church, web page 31:

      Below Henry III. Amboise ceased to be a slaughter-house, as within the previous reign, nevertheless it remained a type of state jail. It’s associated that Anne d’Este of Ferrara, spouse of Duc de Guise, whereas aiding as soon as at a sequence of executions out of the home windows of the fort with Catherine de Medicis, instantly overcome by the horror of the spectacle, turned away, exclaiming passionately, “Ah Madame! how all this blood calls out for blood! what vengeance is being ready! Might God have pity in your sons and on mine!”

    • 2007, Christine Feehan, Lethal Sport, Penguin, →ISBN, web page 55:

      He watched out for the boys in his unit, for the one girl who had saved them so a few years in the past after they have been nonetheless uncooked teenagers out for blood and revenge on the world, and he watched out for anybody else they stumbled throughout of their lives that wanted safety.

    • 2010, Alison Futrell, Blood within the Area: The Spectacle of Roman Energy, College of Texas Press, →ISBN, web page 169:

      The usual evaluation means that because the munera turned purely a spectacle, they turned extra murderous as a result of the general public needed to see blood. That the individuals of Rome have been in a position to indulge this degenerate need was merely as a result of degraded standing of the skilled gladiator.

  11. Various letter-case type of Blood (member of a sure gang).

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

See blood/translations § Noun.

See additionally[edit]

Verb[edit]

blood (third-person singular easy current bloods, current participle blooding, easy previous and previous participle blooded)

  1. (transitive) To trigger one thing to be coated with blood; to bloody.
    • The French gentleman and Mr Adderly, on the need of their commanding officer, had raised up the physique of Jones, however as they may understand however little (if any) signal of life in him, they once more let him fall, Adderly damning him for having blooded his wastecoat []
  2. (drugs, historic) To let blood (from); to bleed.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, web page 121:
      Mr Western, who imputed these signs in his daughter to her fall, suggested her to be presently blooded by means of prevention.
    • 1785, Frances Burney, Journals & Letters, Penguin 2001, p. 212:
      She had been blooded, he stated, 12 occasions on this final fortnight, and had misplaced 75 ounces of blood, moreover present process blistering,and different self-discipline.
  3. (transitive) To provoke into warfare or a blood sport, historically by smearing with the blood of the primary kill witnessed.

Translations[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center Dutch blōde, from Previous Dutch *blōdi, from Frankish *blauthi, from Proto-Germanic *blauþuz (weak).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blood (comparative bloder, superlative bloodst)

  1. (archaic) not brave
  2. (archaic) timid

Synonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center Low German blôt, from Previous Saxon blōd, from Proto-West Germanic *blōd, from Proto-Germanic *blōþą.

Noun[edit]

blood n

  1. blood

See additionally[edit]


Center English[edit]

Various kinds[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Previous English blōd, from Proto-West Germanic *blōd, from Proto-Germanic *blōþą, of unsure origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

blood (plural bloods)

  1. blood

Derived phrases[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

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