definition of shunt by Medical dictionary

definition of dialysis by Medical dictionary
November 16, 2020 0 Comments

shunt

 [shunt]

1. to show to 1 facet; to divert; to bypass.

2. a passage or anastomosis between two pure channels, particularly between blood vessels. Such constructions could also be shaped physiologically (e.g., to bypass a thrombosis), or they could be structural anomalies.

3. a surgical anastomosis.

arteriovenous shunt a U-shaped plastic tube inserted between an artery and a vein (normally between the radial artery and cephalic vein), bypassing the capillary community, a previously frequent technique of arteriovenous entry.

left-to-right shunt diversion of blood from the left facet of the guts to the proper facet, or from the systemic to the pulmonary circulation by means of an anomalous opening reminiscent of a septal defect or patent ductus arteriosus.

mesocaval shunt a portosystemic shunt between the superior mesenteric vein and the inferior vena cava to cut back portal hypertension.

peritoneovenous shunt a tool whose goal is to take away extra ascitic fluid from the peritoneal cavity and return it to the venous system; referred to as additionally LeVeen shunt.

The shunt consists of a peritoneal tube, a one-way valve, and a tube resulting in a big vein, normally the superior vena cava or the jugular vein. The perforated peritoneal tube is positioned within the peritoneal cavity and connected to the one-way valve which opens at a strain of three cm H2O. The valve controls the route of the move of ascitic fluid and prevents a backflow of blood from the vein. A tube main from the valve empties into the venous system.

The shunt is triggered into motion by the affected person’s respiratory. Upon inspiration, the diaphragm descends towards the belly cavity and causes an increase in fluid strain within the thoracic superior vena cava. The distinction in strain, normally about 5 cm H2O, opens the shunt valve, permitting the move of ascitic fluid into the massive vein. The motion of the shunt may be enhanced by the affected person’s inspiring in opposition to strain, as when utilizing a blow bottle.

An obstacle of the shunt is dilution of the blood and a resultant drop in hematocrit, which necessitates transfusion of packed cells and maybe a slowing of the speed of move of ascitic fluid into the venous system. Different inherent dangers are an infection, leakage of ascitic fluid from the operative website, elevated bilirubin, gastrointestinal bleeding, and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

Peritoneovenous (LeVeen) shunt for power ascites strikes fluid from the peritoneal (belly) cavity into the superior vena cava. From Ignatavicius and Workman, 2000.

portacaval shunt a portosystemic shunt between the portal vein and the vena cava.

portosystemic shunt a surgically created shunt that connects the portal and systemic circulations, reminiscent of a mesocaval, portacaval, or splenorenal shunt.

pulmonary shunt an anomaly wherein blood strikes from the venous circulation to the arterial circulation with out collaborating in gasoline change, leading to hypoxemia.

right-to-left shunt diversion of blood from the proper facet of the guts to the left facet or from the pulmonary to the systemic circulation by means of an anomalous opening reminiscent of septal defect or patent ductus arteriosus.

splenorenal shunt an anastomosis of the splenic vein and the left renal vein, created to decrease portal hypertension following splenectomy.

ventriculoatrial shunt the surgical creation of a communication between a cerebral ventricle and a cardiac atrium by way of a plastic tube; finished for aid of hydrocephalus.
ventriculoperitoneal shunt a communication between a cerebral ventricle and the peritoneum by way of plastic tubing; finished for the aid of hydrocephalus.
ventriculovenous shunt a communication between a lateral ventricle and the venous system by way of a plastic tube; finished for aid of hydrocephalus.

Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medication, Nursing, and Allied Well being, Seventh Version. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

shunt

(shŭnt),

1. To bypass or divert.
See additionally: bypass.
2. A bypass or diversion of fluid to a different fluid-containing system by fistulation or a prosthetic gadget. The nomenclature generally contains origin and terminus, for instance, atriovenous, splenorenal, ventriculocisternal.
See additionally: bypass.

[M.E. shunten, to flinch]

Farlex Companion Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

shunt

(shŭnt)

n.

1. The act or means of turning apart or shifting to an alternate course.

2. Medication A passage between two pure physique channels, reminiscent of blood vessels, particularly one created surgically to divert or allow move from one pathway or area to a different; a bypass.

v. shunted, shunting, shunts

v.tr.

Medication To divert or allow move of (a physique fluid) from one pathway or area to a different by surgical means.


shunt′er n.

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Firm. Printed by Houghton Mifflin Firm. All rights reserved.

shunt

The diversion of the move of a fluid—particularly blood, but additionally cerebrospinal fluid—from its regular route to a different, which can be unintended, as in a traumatic arterio-venous aneurysm, or by design (e.g., portocaval shunt or ventriculoperitoneal shunt).

Segen’s Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

shunt  

The diversion of the move of a fluid from its regular pathway to a different, which can be unintended, as in a traumatic AV aneurysm, or by design–eg, portocaval shunt or ventriculoperitoneal shunt. See Arteriovenous shunt, Nodovenous shunt, Denver shunt, Distal splenorenal shunt, LeVeen shunt, Perfusion shunt, Portacaval shunt, Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt Pediatric cardiology Bypassing the pulmonary circulation–shunting is a traditional physiologic course of in utero; it turns into irregular after start Sorts

1. These wherein already oxygenated blood within the left coronary heart passes again into the proper coronary heart–left-to-right shunt and.

2. These which partially bypass the lungs, with venous blood instantly getting into the systemic circulation–right-to-left shunt

Shunt-acyanotic, cyanotic

LR shunt Acyanotic shunt Proper and left sides of the guts talk by an ASD or VSD and PDA; the blood flows from the area of highest–left coronary heart to lowest–proper coronary heart and systemic circulation strain, as happens in VSDs and corrected transposition of nice arteries; for the reason that blood doesn’t bypass the pulmonary circulation, it’s properly oxygenated Medical The plethora of blood causes pulmonary congestion and HTN that turns into important when the pulmonary blood move is 1.5-2.0-fold larger than the systemic move with diastolic overloading and cardiac dilatation which, with out correction, ends in cardiac failure; a late complication is bacterial pneumonia associated to stasis throughout the pulmonary circulation; L →R shunts could also be created surgically–eg, Blalock process

RL shunt Cyanotic shunt Variable diploma of pulmonary circulation bypass accompanied by obstruction of blood move into the pulmonary circulation R→L shunts Fallot’s tetralogy–VSD, pulmonary valve stenosis, overriding or dextroposed aorta and 2º proper ventricular hypertrophy, transposition of nice vessels, tricuspid valve atresia, truncus arteriosus and complete anomalous return of pulmonary veins; pulmonary blood move is lower than in L→R shunts Medical Cyanosis with restricted train tolerance, neurologic injury and compensatory polycythemia; as kids, these Pts are sometimes very sick and by adolescence might undergo acquired coagulopathies

.

McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Trendy Medication. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Firms, Inc.

shunt

(shŭnt)

1. To bypass or divert.

2. A bypass or diversion of fluid to a different fluid-containing system by fistulation or a prosthetic gadget. The nomenclature generally contains origin and terminus, e.g., atriovenous, splenorenal, ventriculocisternal.
See additionally: bypass

[M.E. shunten, to flinch]

Medical Dictionary for the Well being Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

shunt

(shunt) [ME. shunten, to avoid]

1. To show away from; to divert.

2. An anomalous passage or one artificially constructed to divert move from one most important route to a different.

3. An electrical conductor connecting two factors in a circuit to kind a parallel circuit by means of which a portion of the present might move.

anatomical shunt

A traditional or irregular direct connection between arterial and venous circulation. An instance of a traditional anatomical shunt is the bronchial and thebesian vein connection.

arteriovenous shunt

An irregular connection between an artery and the venous system.

Blalock-Taussig shunt

See: Blalock-Taussig shunt

cardiovascular shunt

An irregular connection between the cavities of the guts or between the systemic and pulmonary vessels.

Enlarge picture

DIALYSIS SHUNT

dialysis shunt

An arteriovenous shunt created to be used throughout renal dialysis. See: illustration

left-to-right shunt

The passage of blood from the left facet of the guts to the proper facet by means of an irregular opening (e.g., a septal defect).

physiological shunt

The route by which pulmonary blood perfuses unventilated alveoli. This course of is attributable to an imbalance between air flow and perfusion.

pleuroperitoneal shunt

A conduit connecting the pleural area and the peritoneum, used to empty recurring pleural effusions, reminiscent of people who accumulate in sufferers with sure cancers within the chest. Synonym: Denver shunt

portacaval shunt

Surgical creation of a connection between the portal vein and the vena cava. Synonym: postcaval shunt

postcaval shunt

Portacaval shunt.

reversed shunt

Proper-to-left shunt.

right-to-left shunt

The motion of blood or different physique fluids backward by means of a shunt. The shunted blood has no alternative to turn out to be oxygenated due to failure to move by means of the lungs.

transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

Abbreviation: TIPS

A shunt that’s inserted by means of the pores and skin, jugular vein, and liver after which into the portal venous system to handle problems of portal hypertension, reminiscent of bleeding attributable to esophageal varices or uncontrollable ascites. The shunt decreases strain throughout the portal venous circulation (e.g., in sufferers with cirrhosis), bypassing the liver and permitting portal blood to move instantly into the vena cava. A typical complication of the process is altered psychological standing, since blood that was beforehand detoxified by the liver is directed round it.

Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Companions

shunt

Any bypassing or sidetracking of move, particularly of fluid reminiscent of blood or cerebrospinal fluid. A shunt could also be the results of illness or could also be surgically induced, or inserted as a prosthesis, to impact therapy.

Collins Dictionary of Medication © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Shunt

A small tube positioned in a ventricle of the mind to direct cerebrospinal fluid away from the blockage into one other a part of the physique.

Gale Encyclopedia of Medication. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

shunt

(shŭnt)

1. To bypass or divert.

2. Bypass or diversion of fluid to a different fluid-containing system by fistulation or a prosthetic gadget.

[M.E. shunten, to flinch]

Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

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